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Festival Program

First Nations Curators

The MWF Big Debate: Nihilism Makes Life Worth Living

Sat 10 Sep, 6.30pm

Nihilism doesn’t necessarily mean sucking the joy out of life, in fact a nihilistic attitude can make life all the more worth living – or at least that’s what Paul Beatty’s book The Sellout made a case for. He writes of nihilism as ‘not giving a fuck’, a determined ‘unwillingness to succeed’, an idea taken up by Chelsea Watego in her chapter ‘Fuck Hope’ in Another Day in the Colony. But don’t we need hope to get by? To envision and claim a better future? Activist and scholar Angela Davis thought so, stating ‘We can’t do anything without optimism’.

In the inaugural MWF Big Debate from First Nations Curator Chelsea Watego, two teams comprising our sharpest minds and wittiest word-wielders go head-to-head to argue the case for and against hope. In the affirmative corner, Jackie Huggins, Jamal Nabulsi, Philly and Jeff Sparrow take a nihilistic nose-dive. And in the negative, Jane Caro, Akuch Kuol-Anyieth and Mykaela Saunders make a bullish case for optimism. All under the keen eye of Ronnie Gorrie. Who will you pin your hopes on?

Duration

1 hour

Tickets

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